Maybe the Second Amendment Is The Rock Over Which America Will Break. The Charlton Heston Principle Is Still Alive

Here are some words from David French’s recent post at National Review.

“Last night,[the CCN ‘town hall’ guns debate] the nation witnessed what looked a lot like an extended version of the famous “two minutes hate” from George Orwell’s novel 1984. During a CNN town hall on gun control, a furious crowd of Americans jeered at two conservatives, Marco Rubio and Dana Loesch, who stood in defense of the Second Amendment. They mocked the notion that rape victims might want to arm themselves for protection. There were calls of ‘murderer.’ Rubio was compared to a mass killer. There were wild cheers for the idea of banning every single semiautomatic rifle in America. The discourse was vicious. It was also slanderous. There were millions of Americans who watched all or part of the town hall and came away with a clear message: These people aren’t just angry at what happened in their town, to their friends and family members; they hate me. They really believe I’m the kind of person who doesn’t care if kids die, and they want to deprive me of the ability to defend myself. The NRA has blood on its hands, they said. It’s a terrorist organization. Gun-rights supporters — especially those who oppose an assault-weapons ban — are lunatics at best, evil at worst.”

My day at a mall political stand out yesterday fell right into line with what French is saying. The hate was palpable, scary, and irrational. They were in no mood for definitions and distinctions. What actually is an assault rifle? They couldn’t care less. That all guns are made to kill and not just ‘assault’ rifles they blew right past without a question. That the AR-15 is simply a long rifle dressed up to look tougher they have no time for. Reliance upon government for our defense is an axiom. If you don’t believe that, you are de facto a child killer.

They say that they believe in the second amendment, (you know they don’t) but really you shouldn’t even want to have a gun. The only reason you would want a gun is that you want to kill people. You’re despicable.

The US should be like Australia. Confiscate the guns.

Go back and watch the CNN town hall two minutes of hate. Does that appear rational to you? Maybe French is right. The second amendment is perhaps where the true fault line lies. Maybe that is the place where America breaks.

There are over 300 million guns in American hands. It could be many more. Soon there WILL BE many more in a rush to buy what’s still available. And Americans aren’t giving those up no matter what law is passed. Australians they are not.

The Second Amendment is historically rooted in Americans’ suspicion of tyrannous government, not hunting for food or self-defense against neighbors. This is in the American DNA. History is replete with governments turning on their people, including our history with England during colonial times. As a people we are suspicious of the police powers of the State and its overreach. Americans might be patriotic, but that does not mean they are gullible. It is not not ancient history that teaches citizens to be leery of the State. The disarming of the people in the USSR, Germany, China, Eastern Europe, etc., is recent history. And we know what that led to.

Any attempt to confiscate guns and unduly restrict access to the means of self-defense will lead to severe conflict. Both sides of this debate had better measure themselves and keep this debate as civil as possible. While the conflict over abortion, same sex marriage, euthanasia, etc., will continue, those, by comparison with the gun control controversy, are rather tame. The Charles Heston rule is operational: “I have only five words for you: From my cold, dead hands.”

Winsome Words 2/21/2018

“A river must be happier than a swamp because it has banks and boundaries; a swamp is a valley of liberty that lost its shores and became liberal. Liberty is no heirloom. It requires the daily bread of self denial, the salt of law and, above all, the backbone of acknowledging responsibility for our deeds.” Archbishop Fulton Sheen