Alvin Plantiga, Christian philosopher, interviewed on NPR, exploring the real conflict – not faith vs science but naturalism vs science

Alvin Plantiga is a professional philosopher who has made real contributions to the larger field of philosophy, particularly on the understanding of evil. In his latest book, Where the Conflict Really Lies, philosopher Alvin Plantinga argues that religion and science share more common ground than you might think.

One thought on “Alvin Plantiga, Christian philosopher, interviewed on NPR, exploring the real conflict – not faith vs science but naturalism vs science

  1. Plantinga’s book is primarily directed to atheists (especially naturalists), but has lessons for apologetics as well. Most religious people respect science and all use its findings. Many scientists are religious, some very much so. Both science and religion, however, have limitations which should be mutually respected.

    In my free ebook on comparative mysticism, “the greatest achievement in life,” is a quote by Albert Einstein: “…most beautiful and profound emotion we can experience is the sensation of the mystical. It is the sower of all true science. To know that what is impenetrable to us really exists, manifesting itself as the highest wisdom and most radiant beauty – which our dull faculties can comprehend only in their primitive form – this knowledge, this feeling, is the center of all religion.”

    E=mc², Einstein’s Special Theory of Relativity, is probably the best known scientific equation. I revised it to help better understand the relationship between divine Essence (Love, Grace, Spirit), matter (mass/energy: visible/dark) and consciousness (f(x) raised to its greatest power). Unlike the speed of light, which is a constant, there are no exact measurements for consciousness. In this hypothetical formula, basic consciousness may be of insects, to the second power of animals and to the third power the rational mind of humans. The fourth power is suprarational consciousness of mystics, when they intuit the divine essence in perceived matter. This was a convenient analogy, but there cannot be a divine formula.

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