Dobson leads Howard Stearn in balloting for the Radio Hall of Fame

Click here for article. Dobson has taken quite a beating over the last few years as he seems to stand alone among evangelical personalities against further moral erosion, particularly combatinghomomsexual activists and pornographers. One thing is for sure. Dobson is not feathering his nest or seeking popularity. Other popular evangelical preachers have moved away from him at the speed of light. His bold stands seem to receive more plaudits from the Roman Catholic Church. Who would have ever guessed it would come to this? See the website http://www.jamesdobsondoesntspeakforme.com/  I understand that some in the church may choose to vote for Obama for any number of reasons, some of which appear fair to me. But I think to take on Dr Dobson like this is beyond bounds. While one may disagree with Dobson on this or that, at least he is not an evangelical who embarrasses us with “I-have-a-direct-line-to-God-and-He-told-me-what-to-tell-you” antics. Dobson is a broad based evangelical with a commitment to the authority of the Bible and the use of reason in moral argument. I am amazed at how popular it now is to criticize him. I sure wish Rick Warren and Bill Hybels would publicly affirm him, even as their ministry strategies are softer and less confrontational. Dobson deserves better.

Lots can be really wrong when lots looks okay

The recent financial industry crisis yields a big lesson – everything can look okay when in fact things are very bad off. Who would have thought that in this day and time we would have a banking crisis with all the regulations and information overload and tracking technology? But right under the radar the corruption and fraud and greed were running rampant. Where were the people asking the questions? Where were the prophets? Who was shouting the warnings?

Sounds like a lesson in there for us all. I think most Christians know we ought to be doing church in a different way. But the courage to ring the alarm is lacking. There are too many brochures and conferences detailing extraordinary investment schemes with miraculous returns. It’s hard to turn off the noise. I feel that in “church land” I am living inside a 24/7 infomercial. The simplicity of loving Jesus, living out our lives in the encouragement and support of loving fellowships, and serving the needs of those shattered by sin with the words and deeds of the Gospel gets lost.

I remember a book some time ago that was a best-seller, a book of advice from a father to his son who was leaving for college. Each page was just a short, pity insight into life. One was “don’t go to a church that is raising money for a gym.” I didn’t think much about it at the time. I think I get it now. Church easily becomes about something else. It’s lost confidence in the Gospel, the wonderful power of truth, the towel of service and the life of sacrifice. It can too easily turn into women losing weight, youth building community service resumes for college applications, children meeting the children from the nicer families and giving the “haves” more resources than they can possibly use while the “have nots” go without.

One church recently advertised a visiting speaker and added the exciting news that he was bringing along his worship band. I am not sure what this really added, except that in church land worship has become the band and the “success sermon.” The formula is so old that you would think people would see through it. They don’t. And so it drags on and on. But we will wake up. And when we do, we and the world will all be better off for it.

This is what I like about WillowCreek-hosts dialogue with gay activists

Hybels is nothing if not courageous. Recently Willow hosted a dialogue with Soulforce, a group of homosexual activists, who have targeted several major churches asking for a dialogue. You can imagine the heat he has taken for this. I, for one, think it’s a great idea to invite those who oppose the church and its moral commitments to a worship service, lunch and discussion. It is in the interest of Christ to make it clear that the church is about redemption and that the person fartherest away from God is more loved than we can imagine. I can’t imagine that Hybels in any way gave ground on the moral imperatives of the Bible.

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