When That Rough God Goes Riding

Oh the mud splattered victims
Have to pay out all along the ancient highway
Torn between half truth and victimisation
Fighting back with counter attacks

It’s when that rough god goes riding
When the rough god goes gliding
And then rough god goes riding
Riding on in

I was flabbergasted by the headlines
People in glasshouses throwing stones
Gaping wounds that will never heal
Now they’re moaning like a dog in a manger

It’s when that rough god goes riding
And then the rough god goes gliding
There’ll be nobody hiding
When that rough god comes riding on in

And it’s a matter of survival
When you’re born with your back against the wall
Won’t somebody hand me a bible
Won’t you give me that number to call

When that rough god goed riding
And then that rough god goes gliding
They’ll be nobody hiding
When that rough god goes riding on in
Riding on in

When that rough god goed riding
When that rough god goes gliding
There’ll be nobody hiding
When that rough god goes riding on in
Riding on in

There’ll be no more heroes
They’ll be reduced to zero
When that rough god goes riding
Riding on in
Riding on in
Riding on in
Riding on in

Does the Christian Soul Demand Purgatory?

Thoughtful Christians have always struggled with the usual Evangelical assertion that all that Christians need to be better off is to die. “Absent from the body, present with the Lord.” (2 Cor 5:8) Different states of sanctification seem have no bearing. We, like an electron, jump from one state to another without a trace of journey.

What makes this possible according to the formula is the imputation of Christ. Is this what the author of Hebrews means in writing “without holiness no man shall see the Lord.”? (Hebrews 12:14) CS Lewis thought not. His thought is that one must actually BE holy. In fact, he asserts in Letter to Malcolm that our souls demand a purgation from all actual sin, a bath, as it were, to remove the stain of our pollution. For imputation does not actually remove sin. It covers it.

Lewis rejects the Romish doctrine of purgatory as retributive, undergoing the just deserts of sin. But he apparently sees that there is some need of a full sanctification since no evil can appear in the presence of God. Jerry Walls tries to make CS Lewis’ case here. It seems that John Henry Newman’s restatement on purgatory was of some assistance to Lewis.

See Jerry Wall’s presentation that explores this.

Winsome Words 5/23/15

Whenever you meet someone who has really suffered–someone who has gone through experiences with the Lord that have brought limitation, and who, instead of trying to break free in order to be ‘used’, has been willing to be imprisoned by Him and has thus learned to find satisfaction in the Lord and nowhere else — then immediately you become aware of something. Immediately your spiritual senses detect a sweet savour of Christ. … Watchman Nee